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fer1972:

La Grange de Thèatre posters by Jean-Sébastien Monzani
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falcaolucasart:

Woman.
by FalcaoLucas
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(Source : skimmmmmilk, via lesfemmes)

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(Source : mayansun)

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(via 7sleepers)

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lisaodt:

Usor III

lisaodt:

Usor III

(via patternatic)

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imalikshake:

Mercator’s Projection, Antarctica, 2007 by David Burdeny

imalikshake:

Mercator’s Projection, Antarctica, 2007 by David Burdeny

(via 7sleepers)

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lightfeathers:

Iraq, 1984Baghdad’s al-Shaheed Monument, with its eternal flame, commemorated the Arab victory over Persia at al-Qadisiyyah in 637AD. Saddam Hussein invoked that battle in 1980, before invading modern Persia, Iran. After the Iran-Iraq war ended in 1988, the monument also came to honour nearly 500,000 Iraqis killed in that conflict, in which not an inch of territory ultimately changed hands.

lightfeathers:

Iraq, 1984
Baghdad’s al-Shaheed Monument, with its eternal flame, commemorated the Arab victory over Persia at al-Qadisiyyah in 637AD. Saddam Hussein invoked that battle in 1980, before invading modern Persia, Iran. After the Iran-Iraq war ended in 1988, the monument also came to honour nearly 500,000 Iraqis killed in that conflict, in which not an inch of territory ultimately changed hands.

(Source : mazzystardust, via monpetitsoulier)

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(Source : automotivated, via 7sleepers)

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(Source : airows, via nerviosismo)

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lightfeathers:

Iraq, 1984Baghdad’s al-Shaheed Monument, with its eternal flame, commemorated the Arab victory over Persia at al-Qadisiyyah in 637AD. Saddam Hussein invoked that battle in 1980, before invading modern Persia, Iran. After the Iran-Iraq war ended in 1988, the monument also came to honour nearly 500,000 Iraqis killed in that conflict, in which not an inch of territory ultimately changed hands.

lightfeathers:

Iraq, 1984
Baghdad’s al-Shaheed Monument, with its eternal flame, commemorated the Arab victory over Persia at al-Qadisiyyah in 637AD. Saddam Hussein invoked that battle in 1980, before invading modern Persia, Iran. After the Iran-Iraq war ended in 1988, the monument also came to honour nearly 500,000 Iraqis killed in that conflict, in which not an inch of territory ultimately changed hands.

(Source : mazzystardust, via monpetitsoulier)